9108 hits the water, with a little history behind the design.

 

Great to see Craig Thompson, finish off 9108. The 3rd (I know only 3) of Parker’s most revolutionary addition to the International 505 fleet.

There’s more of a story behind this boat than meets the eye. It’s concept is a combination of inspiration from Bill Parker and John Westell. At a meeting back in the late 1960’s where Bill was talking at a Scott Bader event, with John, they got talking about the rig loadings around the mast-gate (in those days, the mast gate area was open and free standing), lending little support to the side-way pressures of the rig (remember they were initially using wooden spars), so the thought emerged of using an A-frame (of aluminium) to hold the rig.

505twintrapeze_2

By 1973, this concept was developed into a real-life 505 driven by the innovation from the French fleet and what you see below, is LouDan sailing one of these twin-concept trapeze boats.

Fast forward a few years (OK a few decades), this picture sat in my Dad’s office for years, under all the trophies that the boats won, it always inspired me to think why didn’t this concept get put into a production boat.

So when we re-launched the business, I sat down with Bruce Parker (my older brother) and we discussed the concept, we couldn’t just get back into the class with a normal (quite frankly boring design or ugly design), so the concept was sown.

This is the final output a 505 that is powerful enough to take a dual trapeze system (out fo the box), with an A-frame and internal flange system and floor moulding stronger than anything ever produced in the class!

The challenge is the additional weight, these boats appear to be a little heavier, with such a large surface area of additional composite carbon, it adds some more weight.

I think we have solved this, using some better layups and simplification, we can probably drop another 5 kg. off the hull weight. However, boat performance is all about centralizing the weight so the “rocker” of the hull (time to travel between 2 points, is reduced), this boat is incredibly stable on a “swing”, so it means all the main weight and power is based around the mast gate and front of the centre-board case!

Bill is now 80 yrs. old, he loves this boat, it’s his final design of a boat that he fell in love with in 1957, through which we as a family traveled the world, met some great people.

I have had the privalege of having a father that I and John Westell considered to be the greatest interpreter and builder of the International 505, ever in the history of this fleet.

So, there you go, a little history, for what I consider to be the only real innovation in the 505 for almost 35 years, since Parker’s left.

David Parker

A night out with Mike Holt

The one thing that grabs you when you meet Mike Holt is that he exonerates the “ordinary genius!” I recently met him downtown Chicago in Timothy O’Toole’s on North Fairbanks, running late, I landed in the basement and there he is the current twice International 505 world champion at a table sipping a quite beer and no-one knows who he is?

I think the one great thing about Mike is not just his love of the sport, but it’s that he really has the “International 505” somehow flowing through his veins; from his humble beginnings in Essex to traveling the world, I still think, he thinks, he owes the class something when he has brought so much to the class himself.

He must be the most traveled 505 helm ever (up there with Howie), he tells me that he did the “Bloody Mary” in London in January, renowned for being baked in Californian sunshine, who in the right mind would fly 5,000 miles to prove you can race in near “bloody” freezing conditions. Only a mad Englishman living in San Francisco!

So on we go to the local Indian (one of Mikes most favored cuisines) and we get on to the topics of the finer points of sailing, he is a lucky chap with both Rob and Carl being top class crews and a couple of boat around the world, he has made the class his own playground (through brutal hard work), but has also brought so many influences and changes to the class.

Back in San Francisco at the 2009 worlds’ where we first met, he was an impressive heavy weather sailor, now he is just an impressive sailor, back to back wins in Kiel in the German heartland and then South Africa (if anyone doubts they way this man sails then take a peak on youtube of the penultimate race where Mike is on a flyer downwind if you don’t believe me), I have never seen anyone sail the angles and constant speed that he showed that day.

So getting on to boats, what makes him so fast, well he has sorted out his loft, got fast around the entire wind range and can sail with any crew, but when it comes to the boat, he has a vested interest in 9072. We keep chatting and he recon’s that this boat has the most wins of any boat ever to hit the 505 world championships, 9 race wins in total and counting and he suggests that the boat is significantly better than his new one.

This is where it gets interesting, because the human in him comes out, “it feels fast, it sails fast, it makes me fast, it just fits, I can’t tell you why it’s just the best boat I have ever sailed”, quite a line from a man, but it matches his personality with new insights about how he sails.

You see it’s not visual he is talking about feel, the feel for constant speed, height, the ability to always come back no matter where you are.

But more importantly is that he constantly recognizes he makes mistakes, if he could undo all of the past, would he now be on 4 world championship wins (he got the lowest overall points in both San Francisco and Australia), but when many look up to this man for guidance, he is still learning and adapting himself, that’s a demure man for you!

So what next, well he tells me he is heading to the Australian nationals, he said he hasn’t done that one before! And then I quiz him about Weymouth in 2016, mentioning that this is going to be one of the toughest fleets ever.

“That doesn’t bother me”, he says, “look at Kiel, if you can win there you can win anywhere”, and he will be in 9072 his favorite speed machine, so will he equal the gods of Colclough, and Krister (the only sailors to achieve 3 in a row), as he already sits abreast of Farrant, Marks, Elvstrom, Buffet and the rest.

There is definitely more to come from this champion and he is looking fit, sharpe and more than anything makes more water time than many do over several years!

Weymouth will be a battle worth watching.

Congratulations to Mike Holt and Carl Smit – great achievement in being the 2015 International 505 world champion’s.

Parker international 505
Congratulations to Mike Holt and Carl Smit – 2015 Int. 505 world champion’s.

Pure boat speed, empty race track, lots of time on the water and a man who now know’s how to win, in the best sailing class in the world.

Once may be lucky (I don’t think so), but twice in a row magnificent!

Will he match the great Peter Colclough by delivering 3 in a row in Weymouth 2016?

Watch this space!

Who will win the South African International 505 world’s.

Well it’s hotting up again in the 505 fleet, Mike Holt has hardly had time to polish his trophy from last year win in Germany and it’s up for grabs again (that’s if they find the container)!

So with only 35 boats at this year’s world (Parker’s actually offered to ship our moulds to South Africa 18 months ago to build the class for the event, but the offer was refused! – maybe a mistake) it’s going to be a bit of drag race to the finish.

So tactics, may not be the biggest play this year, but protecting your position will be as a right or left big shift if not covered could really mix up the final placings. So in reality there are only 10 boats in with a shout, but with so much space on the race track, a bad leg may not kill the opportunity to post good numbers.

So here goes. Mike Holt has to be the favorite, back with Carl Smit his long-term crew, he has more time on the water than anyone else, tactically he is much better through the wind-range and keeping his head out of the boat. He is on form, fast, becoming reliable and love’s the big winds and seas, so South Africa will suit his style.

Jan Saugmann is not a man to be mixed with twice world champion and now settled into his new Polish built boat, he is a fearsome competitor and is very hot on the first windward leg, he will post good numbers and has a real chance to take this title. He is using a boat with a port-side launcher (similar to the waterat’s of the past), will it be advantageous to have that greater projected sail-area on the first beat?

Then Ian Pinnell, a professional sailor, multi-talented, previous world champion will post some serious numbers and is very comfortable through the wind range, if he can post some early numbers on the board he will be a consistent danger throughout, tactically – the best.

Ted Conrads with Brian Haines, have posted many wins at the worlds, but just not been able to string the numbers in a consistent manner to threaten a title win. Ted with his new family, is probably short on boat time, but he knows his way around a fleet and has some serious speed. One day he is going to be a world champion I have no doubt.

Howie Hamlin, is just Howie, always a threat and with Jeff Nelson on board Mike Martin’s world champion winning crew, he is a dangerous competitor, but with boat troubles (he has one boat in that container fiasco), he has had to rig a new bear hull from scratch along with foils, sails, fittings and set-up, this is a tall order. However, if anyone can do it, Howie can!

Sandy Higgins, will always be up in the top 10 – hot Aussie will post good numbers in the big wind and waves, so watch-out for him.

The disruptors, Stefan Bohm and Terry Scutcher, two very talented sailors and Terry in particular from his current laser performances and affinity to high wind sailing could cause some problems.

However, after this the fleet is weak, so my money’s on Holty (with Ian hovering around closely), being able to polish that trophy (again!) when it finally arrives back on the shores of California.

Mike Holt provides some insights into what makes him such a powerhouse in the International 505 class

David Parker had the opportunity to interview Mike Holt the latest International 505 World Champion who has been the heart and soul of the class for some considerable time and I consider to be the best “heavy weather” sailor ever to step into a 505. Mike kindly offered to be interviewed and provides some great insights into how he approaches sailing in “the most competitive fleet” in modern sports sailing.

Mike Holt Parker 505
Mike Holt wins the 2014 world championship in Kiel Germany

David Parker

Mike, you have changed up the set-ups of your 2 boats over the years, sailing a traditional “West Coast – Californian set-up” (transom mainsheet and Glaser sails) to a more traditional European set-up with center-mainsheet, P&B sails, why did you feel the need to do this and how has it improved your overall performance?

Mike Holt:

I have always had center sheeting, never could get on with transom sheeting! Historically I used P&B sails until 2008 when we switched to a Glaser/M2 combo. We had been on our own path with a Van Munster boat and P&B’s and decided with the Worlds in San Francisco we would go with the equipment we felt was fastest at the time, Rondar hull, M2 mast and for breeze, Glaser sails.

Early last year we started using a suit of P&B’s I had lying around and not used and we liked the look on an Alto mast. Felt that we could sacrifice some high wind speed for better low wind speed, especially with the amount of European sailing we planned in 2014. Basically we wanted to be competitive across the wind range and we felt we achieved this.

I’ve been watching you sail over the years and seen a dramatic change in a couple of areas, first you now believe you can “beat the best” and I think your overall performance through all wind conditions has improved significantly, how did you achieve such a shift in psychology and performance?

Mike Holt Parker 505
Mike and Rob win a tight final race in Kiel Germany to take the 2014 world 505 trophy

We had been scoring good individual race results for a while, but not really able to put a good series together at a Worlds. So we have spent a fair bit of effort on boat preparation, calibration, and perfecting all our equipment and then on executing lower risk strategies when racing. Basically leaving no stone unturned. We also worked on fitness and weight.

Mike, you are renowned for your off-wind speed, what are you looking for on the leg, to gain the most advantage and how does you strategy change from being in the top 5 to down in the 20’s when you round the 1st windward mark?

The goal is always to be in touch at the top mark and then look for opportunities down wind. Once in wire running conditions you need to have a plan as to which side you believe is the correct one and what phase the wind is in when you round the top mark. Has it got left or right, what is it trending. Then execute the run at full speed. We basically just sail the boat down the run as fast as we can.

You changed to a new crew this year with Rob Woelfel to replace Carl Smit (due to business/family commitments) and have been almost untouchable since, what difference has Rob brought to the boats overall performance?

Rob and Carl are both very similar, both very athletic with a burning desire to do the best they can. The advent sailing with Rob last week was simply he could commit the time required to attend all the events and put together a practice schedule. The old time in the boat story…

Now you have one World Championship under your belt, I don’t think you are finished yet, if you were to emulate on of “the greats” of the class who would this be and why and if you sailed against him/her, what would your tactics be?

Mike Holt
Mike Holt, is a class act in the International 505 fleet, an astute heavy weather guru, but over the past few years has gained all round speed that has led him to dominate the class in recent years.

I think we are really lucky to sail against a large number of greats now, Wolfgang, Nico, Howie, Mike M, Jan, Holger, Julien, Ian P, Ethan etc. Earlier in my 5O5 career I sailed against Colclough and Bergstrom too. When we were all together at the Mid Winters in Florida last weekend, we were talking about the evolution of the way we sail the boats, wire running, HA foils etc. The tactics used to be very different, so it would be an interesting challenge to mix 60 years of sailors into a “dream” regatta!

Give a new-comer some advice on sailing the 505?

Copy, copy, copy. Do not believe you can reinvent the wheel. Use the same equipment, mimic the styles and learn to sail the boat.

Mike, I’ve seen some great video of you inside the boat and there’s a lot of intensity in your sailing (almost to the point of madness!), you do lots of work on the helm which may be surprising to some, but how are you maintaining maximum boat speed?

Drugs. Or beer (ed. Mike grew up in Essex, so it’s part of the passing out ceremony for Essex boys when they leave the territory!). Or too much coffee. Back to the previous answer, I watched PC (Peter Colclough) sailing in breeze at a UK Nationals in Prestwick in 1987. He smoked me off the line, so I followed and watched how he sailed the boat. Very aggressive steering and mainsail trimming with the boat very flat.

Mike, thanks for sharing some insights into the class and your approaches to sailing the International 505, Parker’s wish you all the best in South African for the 2015 World Championships.

Mike Holt can be reached at mike@iointegration.com or see him in action at most events!

Who’s going to win the 505 Worlds?

As I predicted on August 17th after the 1st two races, the final day will be a thriller, with the key players from the 1st day still in the race for the final trophy.

Only 4 people can win Mike Holt leading with his incredible heavy weather boat speed and improving all-round condition sailing or the tactics from the Olympic and seasoned multi-class experts like Andy Smith, Peter Nicholas and Ian Pinnell.

In reality Ian has to post a 1st, not unrealistic with two 2nd places but in reality I cannot see him taking the world crown for a 2nd time. However, he is consistent, but Mike will have to come lower than 10th and not let the others in front, he has little control over his own destiny in reality.

So it’s down to Holty, Andy and Peter. Tactically Andy has to sit on Mike Holt and force him down the fleet just like Peter Colclough and Krister Bergstrom of old, pushing Mike down to 12th position or lower, but also watching out for Peter Nicholas, so this is not an easy task, also Andy has only come in front of Mike twice out of the 6 races, so it’s a 2:1 ratio to Mike so far. It’s not a done job by any means, while Peter has beaten Mike equally 3:3. So it’s a tough one to call.

Mike has to just drag race to the front, if he can get clean air it’s going to be difficult to sit on him up front in the fleet, with the possible breakaways, you need the cover and restrictions of other boats to keep a hold and cover on faster boats. If he stays in front of Andy and Peter he will be good for his first victory and what a victory that would be!

What is more impactful, it that there will be no German winner on home soil, at the beginning it could have been a white-wash, with the talent in this German team, but I think the high winds have just knocked on the door of there all-round game which is strong. I predicted that they would get 7 of the top 10 places, so I was wrong they will see at least 6 to once again dominate the 505 fleet numbers.

So who will it be as a winner for 2014, I think Andy Smith has shown incredible consistency and for this reason and his tactical capabilities he could just turn August 22nd into his first world championship crown.

On a personal note, nobody is more deserving of this title than Mike Holt, without Mike the class would be a shadow of itself a dedicated 505 sailor from a young age and one of the nicest people you will ever meet, I would love him to raise this trophy high above his head to justify the presence he has made in this class and his dedication to the sport over many many years.

The best of luck to all 4 of you!

Why Ovington and Rondars are breaching the trust of the International 505 class.

I read with great interest the recently distributed “proposals for the 2014 AGM” to be held at the Kiel 2014 worlds event on August 21st 2014. I don’t think in my 40 years of involvement in the class I have ever seen such blatant “gerrymandering” of the rules to benefit those who don’t clearly comply with them!

Since John Westell designed the International 505, the templates were there as a guide to the builders to provide tolerances to enable them to build boats without fear of them not measuring. So accelerate from 1954 to 2014 (some 60 years) and we find ourselves clearly in a place where some builders cannot manage to build boats that measure.

So instead of being honest with themselves and looking at the rules in more details, some decide that it may be easier to propose measurement changes at the AGM so their “boat building mistakes” can be incorporated into the rules.

Some of the recent behavior by the class leaves a lot to be desired, I suspect I know fairly well (who) is behind this suggested change. A few/or one very influential individual who benefits enormously from the class sailors, enough so, for them to make a very reasonable living. However, too naive to admit that the so called perfect “computer designed 505” probably doesn’t comply with the current rules and therefore is not actually a 505 (by the way this doesn’t offer a pass to the other builder, who has blatantly broken the rules for years)!

For an actual country class association (Germany) to suggest such changes is “ballsy” to say the least and damn right blatant at best. Then to include phrases like “current boat builders had difficulties to meet the required height range for the top of gunwale” – are you kidding me! You mean you cannot make a boat that is deep enough not to have the templates touch the center-band of the boat or the hull, clearly making it illegal!

To be then follow-up later with “current boat builders had difficulties to meet the required height range for the keel band.” So lets change the rules once again, because someone cannot measure between 3mm and 4.5 mm in height of the keel band from the hull!

At this stage, the rules are beginning to resemble a new boat called a “506” and simple suggestions like, why don’t we reduce the weight by 20lbs become sensible, considering the age of the sailors in the class.

In the same proposal Rondar’s (or someone representing them in the German 505 association) declare “that a builder would like to add more buoyancy chambers to the boat, because it will be a good idea, good idea for who apart from the builder?”

Or perhaps, they have already built the boat with the additional elements (which are not within the current rules) and now are asking to repent for their sins by another change to the rules? I remember when Parker’s built the new 2013 boat we followed the rules and wrote to the IRC and it’s executives indicating that we had checked our boat had complied with the Section B. rules of the International 505 class.

Quotes like this are totally unprofessional and unbelievable “boat builders (e.g. Rondar) have taken actions to improve both the production process and the quality of the finished boat by improving the deck mould design and the deck/hull assembly process. As a free side effect additional buoyancy chambers could be offered (what’s a free side effect?):

a) left/right from the mast

b) at the transom

Additional buoyancy chambers are welcome for security and would be acceptable as long as the current chambers stay separated and their bulkheads stay unchanged. While option a) is acceptable without a rule change option b) would need a small rule adjustment.”

No, what Rondar’s have really done is build an illegal boat, but instead of talking to the 505IRC, they obviously ignored the rules and built a boat that “they” think is advancing the class, well Rondar’s are wrong and if someone buys one of these boats then you have a 505 that doesn’t measure!

Comments like “small rule adjustment”, suggest that the German 505 association are now judge and jury and think it’s their right to interpret the rules on behalf of boat builders. While you are at it, why don’t you put in a double floor (oh, sorry just read your website and you’ve done that as well another illegal adaptation) or extend the hull a little bit on the waterline and make the boat a little wider at the stern that would only need a “b) would need a small rule adjustment.” as well, why not make the centerboard a little longer and the spinnaker pole!

The 505 world association is getting into deep trouble with “rogue builders” there are only a few and everyone knows who they are but are too scared to mention names. It’s obvious to me – since we measured some 9XXX series boats some time back and we couldn’t get them to measure – we were perplexed to why and how they passed international measurement rules at any events, until we realized that no-one was really measuring the hulls anymore?

To check our findings we actually compared our templates to the 505 master’s, ours are a perfect match and our measurer (20 years on the IYRU technical committee) had probably measured 1,000 505’s over his life as well as designing 4 complete models, so I trust his abilities to measure a 505 hull and they didn’t measure and still don’t.

When we did mention the issues found and confronted the IRC committee (at the worlds in La Rochelle) with our findings, great silence descended everywhere, like we were the problem! When in fact it’s the IRC continual inability to deal with the measurement issues in the 505 class that are the problem. We even wrote to the ISAF, no response! At some stage the ISAF will have to take charge if some firm control over the behavior of these people and builders is not put in place.

Finally the most unfortunate thing about this whole issue is the way the class has treated the class sailors. Many dedicated over the years expecting the Int. 505 association (as they pay there membership) to ensure that when they relinquish their hard earned money for a boat, that at least they could expect to be buying a boat that actually measures but no.

My advise, most people in Europe are covered by the EEC directive on the “sale of goods act” that protects the consumers rights to ensure that what they think they are buying is what they are buying. So if your boat doesn’t measure you have legal right for recourse and compensation through the EU courts.

I have been informed that similar issues have happened to the contender class, to such an extent that the rules were changed to accommodate a “rogue” builder who decided to use the tolerances to alter the boat shape, these then led to a rule change! Similar happened with the Lark and 420 builder in recent years in the UK (the same builder by the way). So what does the ISAF do? Nothing!

Lets just hope that these proposed rule changes are given short shrift during the meeting and buried forever, so the class can get back to business as the best high-performance dinghy ever to have hit the water!

The SAP International 505 World’s at Kiel, Germany – who will win!

Well, the world’s are now in action at Kiel, a huge fleet has turned out for this championship race with at least 20 top contenders all capable of carrying off the trophy. But so much will depend on the weather this week.

If the wind stays up watch out for Mike Holt, perhaps the best “big-wind” sailor in the fleet today, he works the boat really hard and focuses on incredible speed to keep him out of trouble. Although not a seasoned Olympian, he just won the British 505 nationals and narrowly missed being world champion in both San Francisco and Hamilton Island on discards. If the stays up, he is going to put some serious numbers on the board, letting him throw some of the poor performances.

Likewise Howie Hamlin and Wolfgang Hunger, all perform well in big weather, so by the looks of the forecast, the wind will remain in for the 1st half of the event it will be interesting to see how they are set for the lay-day.

The fleet is dominated by the German’s so I would expect by the end of the week for them to hold around 7 of the top-positions and if the wind goes soft, they will use their incredible experience to mark some numbers on the board.

The we have Jan Saugmann, in his new boat, with a DNF in the 1st race and a 13th in the second, the twice world champion may find it hard to recover from this position to come within the top 10. Andy Smith (GB) is a newcomer and with Ian Pinnell, always putting numbers in I have an outline feeling that if the fleet goes “Olympic” with variable racing conditions these two – fireball and 505 world champions will put some serious markers on the board. Andy looks like a tactical wizard, being able to manipulate himself through difficult and big fleets.

Nicholas is a class act and with a 4th in the second race can afford to throw the 1st, interestingly only 4 of the top 10 have consistent numbers and this early on, you need to score some 1st to be able to throw out the bad numbers that some of them have.

Today’s racing (if held) will be interesting to see who puts some good numbers in. But if the wind stays high and “Holty” could dominate really early giving him that break later in the week, however his all-round speed is much improved this year with a change of loft.

Watch-out it will be interesting, but as I say the 1st 10 around the 1st windward mark will really be the players, so getting a good start with speed, the top mark will really establish the leaders for the rest of the race.

 

 

1954 Parker 505 – 434

IMG_0312 IMG_0311

IMG_03101954 Parker 505 - 434

Here’s an interesting photograph of the 1st measurement plans on the 1st 505 ever built by Bill Parker in 1954. You will notice some interesting features of the original plans.

1. They are signed by John Westel himself dated 01/01/1954, when he visited Bill in Boston, Lincolnshire and personally measured the boat himself.
2. The distinct lack of any measurement or even mention of a mast-gate area.
3. That the new Parker 505 takes it’s lines exactly from the original plans as intended by the designer and Bill was the advisor on the new radical design of the 2013/14 Parker 505.
4. Bill and John became best friends until his death and had the highest regard for each others skills, ambition and innovation for the class.
5. For those that ask about our credentials, 60 years of 505 experience goes a long way!